Beta Launch: Limited Training

Menu

Published on October 15, 2019

Should You Quit Drinking Diet Soda

Josh Hines

Josh Hines

Should You Quit Drinking Diet Soda

Does Drinking Diet Soda Really Make A Difference

Written on October 15, 2019 • 4 Minute Read • Comments

Most people think that if they drink diet or zero calorie sodas that they are doing better. But is this really the case? Are you really doing your body a good service by drinking diet?

Related Article: What's On Your Garbage List

Is Diet Soda Actually Bad For You

I think a lot of times when people are trying to lose weight but don't want to give up soda, they think that if they drink diet or zero calorie sodas that it is actually better.

When we think about it, we think that by eliminating high-sugary drinks, it should be okay, right?

Well in order to answer that question, we first must ask, if soda companies aren't using sucrose in their drinks, what are they replacing it with?

What's Substituted In Diet Soda

The problem though with diet drinks is that in order to keep a similar taste, you know that sweet flavor, but not use sugar, soda producers use eight high-intensity sweeteners approved for use in food by the United States' Federal Drug Administration (FDA):

  • Saccharin
  • Aspartame
  • Acesulfame Potassium
  • Sucralose
  • Neotame
  • Advantame
  • Steviol Glycosides (stevia)
  • Monk Fruit Extract (luo han guo)

What The FDA Suggests

When thinking of high-intensity sweeteners, it's just like anything in life, with moderation, everything should remain okay.

Here is how much of each sweetener the FDA recommends consuming for a 150-pound person:

Sweetener Sweeter Than Sugar Acceptable Daily Limit
Acesulfame Potassium (Sweet One®, Sunnett®) 200x 1,020 mg
Advantame 20,000x 2,230 mg
Aspartame (Nutrasweet®, Equal®, Sugar Twin®) 200x 3,400 mg
Neotame (Newtame®) 10,000x 20.4 mg
Saccharin (Sweet and Low®, Sweet'NLow®) 400x 1,020 mg
Sucralose (Splenda®) 600x 340 mg

What's Used In Your Favorite Brands

Now that you understand each sweetener and what is recommended by the FDA, here is a list of which sweeteners are in popular sodas:

Brand Sweeteners
Diet Coke 187.5 mg aspartame
Diet Coke with Splenda 45 mg acesulfame potassium + 60 mg sucralose
Coke Zero 87 mg aspartame + 46.5 mg acesulfame potassium
Diet Pepsi 177 mg aspartame*
Pepsi One 45 mg acesulfame potassium + 60 mg sucralose
Diet Dr. Pepper 184.5 mg aspartame
Diet Mountain Dew 85.5 mg aspartame + 27 mg acesulfame potassium + 27 mg sucralose
Sprite Zero 75 mg aspartame + 51 mg acesulfame potassium

So Is Soda Safe To Drink

When you are trying to figure out if diet soda and zero calorie soda is safe, you must first understand that each of these substitutes don't have the same effect on the body.

Richard Mattes, Ph.D., a professor of nutrition science at Purdue University and the director of The Ingestive Behavior Research Center, did a research study to determine how each high-intensity sweetener effected people.

He tested 123 people for three month and had them consume roughly 3.5-5 cans of soda daily. What he found was a compelling difference between how each sweetener effected people.

What he found was those whom consumed aspartame, stevia and sucralose really didn't see any differences in weight but those who consumed saccharin, the artificial sweetener found in Sweet 'N Low, gained 2.6 pounds, nearly 60% more than just consuming sucrose.

So What Should You Do

So outside of that finding by Professor Mattes, there really hasn't been any significant findings that tell people they shouldn't consume diet sodas.

Like anything when it comes to food and drink, it's only in the extremes that anything really is bad.

I mean if you really think about it, even water could be dangerous in extreme uses

When you drink a large amount of water and don't use the restroom you can upset your PH levels in your body which can cause death as those at Nintendo found out with their, "Don't Pee For A Wii" radio contest a few years back.

You're Only Going To Know, If You Try For Yourself

When trying to determine if diet soda is or isn't for you, as in everything, experiment for yourself.

One week count how many sodas you drink, then go a few weeks without drinking soda and see what effects the change has on your body.

Josh Hines

About The Author: Josh Hines

Josh Hines is the founder of Second Chance Athletics. Having a background in marketing for most of his career, it was in 2018 that he decided he wanted to take everything he knew about business and start his own personal training business.

Related Nutrition & Meals Blog

How I Recover From Cheat Meals... Or Cheat Days

Josh Hines

Josh Hines

How I Recover From Cheat Meals... Or Cheat Days

Start Your 1-1 Training Today And Change Your Life

From workouts to personalized fitness plans and personal training, you'll discover the best ways to stay on top of all fitness and health goals.

Start Your 4-Day Jumpstart

The 4-day jumpstart program was created for someone who has just decided to start working towards a fitness goal. This program helps you to set a good foundation so that you know exactly where you are and are able to take your next step towards achieving your goal.

Scroll